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research:characterization_of_oral_antibiotics_for_acne_treatment [2017/10/29 17:06]
schillil
research:characterization_of_oral_antibiotics_for_acne_treatment [2020/02/17 22:41] (current)
crundle
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 **Objective:​** ​ **Objective:​** ​
-Aim 1: Characterize ​the international distribution of oral antibiotic use for acne in the pediatric and young adult population ​ages 12 to 21. +To characterize ​the international distribution of oral antibiotic use, specifically antibiotic type and duration, ​for acne in two age groups: youth (ages 12 to 20) and adults (ages 21 to 40)
-Aim 2: Characterize the international distribution of oral antibiotic use for acne in the adult population ages 22 to 60.+
  
 //​**Rationale:​** // //​**Rationale:​** //
-Acne is a common and disabling medical condition, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults.[1]  ​According to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016, acne is the most disabling skin condition worldwide, responsible for 0.28% of global burden from all diseases.[2]  ​In addition to physical disfigurement,​ the profound psychosocial effects of acne have been recognized for over half a century.[3 ​Guidelines established by the American Academy of Dermatology recommend minimizing the duration of systemic antibiotics for the management of acne ideally to 3-4 months ​and no longer than 6 months ​in order to decrease risk of resistance.[1 A recent systematic review demonstrated that over 50% of P. acnes strains are reported as resistant in all major regions of the world.[4 In addition to promoting resistance, long-term oral antibiotic use has been associated with a number of adverse events including microbiome disruption and pharyngitis,​ as well as possible associations with inflammatory bowel disease and obesity.[5]  ​Despite these adverse effects, oral antibiotics are often prescribed for acne for longer durations than acne guidelines recommend.[5 A large retrospective cohort study of teenagers in the UK revealed that 29% of antibiotic courses prescribed by general practitioners exceeded 6 months in duration.[5 A similar retrospective cohort study of teenagers and young adults in the US found that 18% of antibiotic courses exceeded 6 months.[6 Our study will investigate oral antibiotic use for acne over the last ten years across the globe in both pediatric/​young adult and adult populations. ​ OHDSI network evidence will identify areas of the globe most in need of improving guideline concordance//​.//​+Acne is a common and disabling medical condition, particularly amongst adolescents and young adults.1 According to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016, acne is the most disabling skin condition worldwide.2 In addition to physical disfigurement,​ the profound psychosocial effects of acne have been recognized for over half a century.3 ​ Guidelines established by the American Academy of Dermatology recommend minimizing the duration of systemic antibiotics for the management of acne to the shortest possible duration, ​ideally to 3-4 monthsin order to decrease ​the risk of bacterial ​resistance.1 ​ A recent systematic review demonstrated that over 50% of P. acnes strains are reported as resistant in all major regions of the world.4 ​ In addition to promoting resistance, long-term oral antibiotic use has been associated with a number of adverse events including microbiome disruption and pharyngitis,​ as well as possible associations with inflammatory bowel disease and obesity.5 Despite these adverse effects, oral antibiotics are often prescribed for acne for longer durations than acne guidelines recommend.5 ​ A large retrospective cohort study of teenagers in the UK revealed that 29% of antibiotic courses prescribed by general practitioners exceeded 6 months in duration.5 ​ A similar retrospective cohort study of teenagers and young adults in the US found that 18% of antibiotic courses exceeded 6 months.6 ​ Our study will investigate oral antibiotic use for acne over the last five years across the globe in both pediatric/​young adult and adult populations. ​ OHDSI network evidence will identify areas of the globe most in need of improving guideline concordance//​.//​
  
-**Project Lead(s):​** ​ //Chante Karimkhani, ​Robert P. Dellavalle, Lisa M. Schilling//+**Project Lead(s):​** ​ //Robert P. Dellavalle, Lisa M. Schilling//
  
 **Coordinating Institution(s):​** //​University of Colorado School of Medicine// **Coordinating Institution(s):​** //​University of Colorado School of Medicine//
  
-**Additional Participants:​** // //+**Additional Participants:​** //Chandler Rundle: chandler.rundle@gmail.com;​ Chante Karimkhani: ck2525@caa.columbia.edu;​  
 +Megan Branda: MEGAN.BRANDA@cuanschutz.edu;​ 
 +John Barbieri: john.barbieri@uphs.upenn.edu;​ 
 +Chris Knoll: cknoll1@its.jnj.com;​ 
 +David Margolis: margo@mail.med.upenn.edu;​ 
 +Patrick Ryan: ryan@ohdsi.org;​ 
 +Martijn Schuemie: m.schuemie@erasmusmc.nl;​ 
 +Jonathan Silverberg: JonathanISilverberg@gmail.com;​  
 +Dylan Ray: DYLAN.RAY@cuanschutz.edu;​ 
 +Sara Deakyne: Sara.DeakyneDavies@childrenscolorado.org//
  
 **Full Draft Protocol:** //Please provide any comments or suggestions.//​ **Full Draft Protocol:** //Please provide any comments or suggestions.//​
research/characterization_of_oral_antibiotics_for_acne_treatment.1509296810.txt.gz · Last modified: 2017/10/29 17:06 by schillil